HUSL--Help oUr Students Learn

A place for teachers to place strategies that help our students become effective learners. * Does being an effective student mean being an effective READER? * Setting Purpose * Signals of confusion in reading

Thursday, October 13, 2005

Use Background Knowledge
Students often forget that they have a lot of information already stored away. Making connections to what they already know makes learning a new concept easier.
Purpose: Students reflect on what they already know about a task or topic so that it is easier to learn and understand new information. The strategy helps them see the connection between what they know and what they are learning.
Examples:
Language Arts – The Lord of the Flies – Goal: Identify themes of the novel.
Ask the class to imagine themselves as a group of students who has taken over Arapahoe; there are no adults and they have no access to anything outside of the school. What do you think would happen? Students would use knowledge of their peer group to determine what might happen and how they would create a hierarchy.

Science – Goal: Identify ecological biomes
Students are asked to list different places that they have been on vacations and trips. How where the areas different? What was the weather like? What kinds of animals did they see? What kind of vegetation did they see?

Social Studies – Goal: Identify the effect of new inventions on the industrial revolution.
Ask students to think about new innovations in technology in the last ten years – i.e., iPods, DVD, internet access, etc. How have these innovations changed their lives? How do they think changes made during the industrial revolution might have effected peoples’ lives?

3 Comments:

At 2:12 PM, Blogger mschneider said...

Awesome information. How do you know so much about so many disparate topics? Good luck tomorrow.

 
At 12:35 PM, Blogger Davis said...

In the curriculum innovation team, Rob Escue talked about the importance of background knowledge. He gave an excellent example: when he discusses the Cold War, his view of the Soviet Union (a.k.a. The Evil Empire), is totally different than the view his students have (a.k.a. just a large country that is no longer). What a great example. Students can then, in discussing what they think of the Cold War discover how his view is different and certainly WHY. This is the so important and really makes the student take interest in their learning.

 
At 1:07 PM, Blogger J. Comp said...

BK is the main determinent of comprehension-meaning is not created in isolation-kids have to have knowledge to put the new knowedge in to. We have to teach kids that if they have no background knowledge, they need to advocate for themsleves and ask for it. Otherwise, it takes a great deal of time to create maening so that they understand.

 

Post a Comment

<< Home